11.11.2017

Dennis writes a letter to his sons.

As is his practice when he is serving in different parts of the world, Dennis wrote a letter to our sons today. These letters will be kept forever, and hopefully cherished by all of our children. I share this one because it is applicable to all of us, and provides a glimpse into the heart and mind of my husband. People often see one side of this man, but like many wonderful men, his family sees and knows much more.
I pray you will be encouraged by his words.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Greetings My Sons,

Working in an Emergency Room is a five senses kind of job. To be sure there is much to see (I once saw an “entry/exit” gun shot wound through the forearm. When irrigating the wound, the water went in one side and came out the other much like you would see in a cartoon.), hear (crying/screaming children, this is a given, and non-stop for hours upon hours), touch (bodies, blood, bile, pus, etc.), smell (the smells are quite memorable), and, yes…taste (thankfully, not often). Regardless of the senses involved, during the course of a twelve-hour night shift there is a strong possibility some form of adventure will unfold.

One evening we had a patient, an elderly man, who was experiencing the five senses of illness. This poor guy was in bad shape. Raging fever, loss of bowel control, vomiting…you get the picture. A nurse was prepping the patient for the doctor when the man turned his head to the side and vomited on the floor. As the nurse called for someone to clean up the soiled floor, a man walked in wearing a golf shirt and casual pants. He grabbed a towel from underneath the counter and wiped up the vomit. He then placed the towel in the dirty linen hamper and asked the nurse, “What are we waiting for with this patient?” She replied, “The doctor.” Without missing a beat, the man stepped forward and said, “Hello sir, my name is Dr. Rosing, what can I do for you this evening?” This was his first shift on his first night at our ER. What a great introduction to Dr. Keith Rosing!

My point this week…SERVE! I know, I know, you have heard this story. “If you want to be a leader, serve”. Blah, blah, blah…

Please give a fresh effort to listen to what I am saying. Service comes in many forms and functions. When the sun is shining and friends are going down to the beach to pick up trash in the name of Jesus - I am in! When we are driving over to drop off groceries for a popular cause that everyone deems worthy and necessary, and it does not cut into my free time - Absolutely, count me in! However, there are times when serving is not convenient with my schedule (during a sporting event, scheduled free time, or a preferred activity), or the task to be completed is not considered conducive to my opinion of acceptability (interacting with certain members of the family, a task that takes more than 30 minutes, doing an unassigned chore, etc.).

The fact is, I am a selective service type of human. My service is often self-determined by a list of “ifs” rather than complete surrender to what, where, and when God is moving me to action. Please consider an example.
There is a couple in Cambodia, Scott and Helen, who have moved here with the intent of serving in the international school. Scott teaches math and Helen is the secondary principal. They have two wonderful young children. During dinner one evening, I asked them where they were attending church in Cambodia. Scott replied, “We attend a Khmer church plant in Phnom Penh.” I then asked, if he understood what the pastor was saying and he said, “No. I get a little bit of the sermon but for the most part, I do not understand the message.” I laughed and said, "You are attending a church where you don’t know what the pastor is saying?” Without hesitation, Scott smiled and said, “It is more about serving than anything else. We attend a morning service in English and then an afternoon service in Khmer. I figure that is why we are here.”

Admittedly, his reply humbled me. This family came to Cambodia to be all in. Including attending a church in which the language remains unknown, save a few words here and there. And, they are making a significant difference where God has planted them. Few people will ever know their story and their daily sacrifices, yet they are people who recognize that GOD is the one who has directed their steps and he will lead them to the next endeavor.

Gentlemen, God's work has never been measured by the difficulty of the task but is often accomplished due to the availability of the servant. There are numerous excuses and reasons available as to why someone else should do the “heavy lifting” of serving others. It reminds me of the quote by Chuck Swindoll, “The trouble with the Christian life is that it is so daily.” There is always some reason (personal preference, desire, lint on my clothing) that will keep me from serving.

The LORD often provides amazing “God moments” that look very much like everyday service to others.

Though mission trips, youth events, and training teachers Cambodia are fun and worthy ways of serving, it is the common elements of daily events where we truly learn to serve. Let’s you and I learn to be Christian men who serve. Daily.

Love,
Dad

No comments: